Carlyle Hulet

Carlyle Hulet

KANAB — Carlyle Stevens Hulet, 97, completed his final route Aug. 29, 2019. Carlyle, aka Dad, Pops, The Old Gentleman, Gent, Grandpa, Great-Grandpa, Great-Great-Grandpa and Uncle, was born in Parowan to Rupert Wallace and Sarah Emily Stevens Hulet Feb. 9, 1922, in his grandfather Steven’s home. His mother was very ill when she had him so he was as well. He had such white hair his mother said it looked like he was frostbitten. He was the fourth son in a family of nine children including Beatrice, Rupert Stevens, Ralph Francis, Ruby, Leonard Elliot, Evaleen, John Charles and Herbert Wallace. The family did not have much and worked very hard on their farm with their sheep and cows. He and his brother, Elliot, slept in a sheep wagon at the side of their house for eight years.

Dad attended school in Parowan where in first grade the kids were taught how to flush a toilet. He loved school and credited his teachers with the good examples they set; he carried these throughout his life. In high school he played in the band and played basketball. Basketball was a lifetime love. He graduated high school with a scholarship to Logan but didn’t have enough money to go there so he transferred it to Cedar City BAC. The scholarship was $150, $75 for the year and $75 for books and other things. He lived with Elliot in Cedar City and worked at the Arden Dairy for 30 cents an hour. During this year in college he played on the basketball team and earned a letter (this is one thing he wanted in his obituary). It was during this time he was getting better acquainted with his sweetheart, Norma Lemmon, from Parowan.

Dad and Mom married Oct. 9, 1942, and spent almost 68 years together. She passed away Feb. 3, 2010. Their first daughter, Dianne, was born Oct. 31, 1943, and they were sealed in the St. George temple Dec. 23, 1943. Upon returning from the temple, his draft notice was in the mail. He reported to Fort Douglas in Salt Lake and was inducted into the Army. After training, he headed to Europe, docking in Liverpool, England, and then to France, landing on Omaha Beach where he saw 10,000 white crosses. He said he was sure then he would never come home. In Paris he was put on a train and then on trucks to Liege, Belgium, then to a staging area in Holland where he was reassigned from the infantry to the artillery. His battery was the first troops to enter Germany proper, Aachen, Germany. He spent over six months on the front lines. Four of his brothers serving during this time returned home. Elliot was killed in action.

Returning from the war, he started his business in 1946. He would pick up raw milk in 10-gallon milk cans from as far away as Circleville returning to the bottling plant in Cedar City. His business changed to finished products and his route took him from Cedar City through Bear Valley over to Circleville, Panguitch, Kanab, Fredonia, Zion Park, Springdale, Rockville, Toqueville and back to Cedar City. He did this three times a week for over five years. During this time there were four children added, Steven, Valeen, Craig and Tom.

In 1956 Dad and Mom built their home in Kanab. The Glen Canyon Dam was being built during this time and there were more opportunities for business. During these busy years there were three more children added to the family, Boone (Dan), Lorraine and Debbi. He was the first dairy distributor in Page as the town was being built. His business continued to expand from Panguitch to just north of Flagstaff, Arizona, and from Kanab to the Four Corners. He had warehouses in Kanab, Page, Tuba City, Arizona, and Kayenta, Arizona. He provided services to restaurants, trading posts, stores, national parks, schools and any place he could see a need for his products. Throughout the years he owned his business, Dad figured he had employed 81 people as well as of all his sons, sons-in-law and many of his grandsons. All who worked with him knows of his strong work ethic and the need for honesty in all your dealing. 

In 1989 he scaled back the business to Kanab and in 2014 sold the business to his son and daughter-in-law, Boone and Laurie. Boone had worked side by side with Dad for 17 years. He continued to help Boone until Boone’s death in 2015, and then Laurie and Caleb until 2018.

Throughout his life he was dedicated to his wife, family, friends and his church. He served in many capacities in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. One he loved the most was bishop; he said he always felt like he made a difference in many lives.

Dad and Mom wanted their family to know each other and began having yearly family reunions and they continued this tradition for over 30 years.

He is survived by his children, Dianne (Dennis) Harris, Mesa, Arizona; Steven (Cheryl) Hulet, Kanab; Valeen Brown, Circleville; Craig (Nubia) Hulet, Salt Lake City; Tom (Barbara) Hulet, Olathe, Colorado; Laurie Hulet, Kanab; Lorraine (Tim) Milstead, Allen, Texas; and Roger and Stephanie Williams, Kanab; sister, Evaleen George, Cody, Wyoming; sister-in-law, Betty Hulet, Nipomo, California; and 69 grandchildren, one 113 great-grandchildren and 13 great-great grandchildren. 

He was preceded in death by his parents, two sisters and five brothers; his sweetheart, Norma; daughter, Debbi Williams; son, Daniel (Boone) Hulet; son-in-law, Larry Brown; daughters-in-law, Caleen Hulet and Renon Hulet; and grandson-in-law, Greg Keller.

The family would like to express their gratitude to Shirley (his girl Friday) and Zions Way Hospice for their kindness and caring.

Visitation services will be held in Kanab at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints stake center Sept. 13, from 6 to 8 p.m., and Sept. 14, from 9 to 10:45 a.m., with the funeral to follow at 11 a.m. Arrangements were made with Mosdell Mortuary.